hey… this is r*volv*cl… i have to change my url for a while. maybe i’ll explain later.


16, Sep with 0 notes

joshpeck:

putting stuff on your blog that you enjoy is 10000% better than trying to stick to one category


16, Sep with 3117 notes
sixsecondshigh:

Why Alysia Montano wears a flower in her hair during every race.
Even though she grew up playing football, shooting hoops and running races against all the boys in her neighborhood, U.S. 800-meter champion Alysia Montano never wanted to be thought of as one of them.
As a result, she started wearing a flower behind her right ear to remind the boys they were getting beat by a girl.
The flower remains Montano’s trademark even though her opponents are now world-class female middle-distance runners.
"The flower to me means strength with femininity," Montano said in June after winning the 800 at the U.S. Olympic trials. "I think that a lot of people say things like you run like a girl. That doesn’t mean you have to run soft or you have to run dainty. It means that you’re strong."
Source - 
sixpenceee:

Thermal recording of the ALS ice bucket challenge (source)
lindsaychrist:

caught in the act
louisezhang:

VERMIFORM STEAKS 2014vinyl acrylic and oil on birch wood90 cm diameter
Images: docQment
Louise Zhang
❝ Coercion is when you make the consequences to saying “no” to intimacy so great that it removes any reasonable choice. There is more obvious coercion, such as threats, either externally or internally directed. But I find that coercion just sort of organically arises when you believe that your partner, in that moment, owes you intimacy. If you think your partner owes you intimacy, and you are just “expressing your feelings,” there’s a good chance you’re being coercive. If your partner says “no,” and you start preparing for a fight instead of accepting their choice, you’re probably going to be coercive.

16, Sep with 1545 notes
codelens:

Enforcement Officials Beat & Kidnap a 12-yo Black Girl in Front of her Residence, Claiming She Was a Prostitute
"When her mother and father came outside after hearing her cries for help she was desperately holding a tree with one arm while plainclothes officers were beating her in the head, neck and throat.
Dymond Milburn, now 20-years-old, was an honor student attending advanced classes at Austin Middle School, when her life would be forever scarred by Galveston police.”
None of the enforcement officials who terrorized and beat Milburn were penalized.